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Workers Brave the Cold

With record setting freezing temperatures, experts are recommending not to spend an extended amount of time outdoors but some people have to as it is their job.
"It is our job, but we do appreciate when people appreciate us. The one thing we ask is give us some space so we can do our job safely, because we do have a family to go home to." - Nick Kennedy
With record setting freezing temperatures, experts are recommending not to spend an extended amount of time outdoors but some people have to as it is their job.

Towing companies have been working around the clock in this frigid cold to help people that have been stranded while driving.

"They do get a little emotional every once in awhile, it they've been there for awhile and are still cold."

Tow truck operator Nick Kennedy finished up a 20 hour shift and says he's rescued so many people that he can't keep track.

"I lost count.  After that many hours you just go to the next one, go to the next one, and go to the next one and when you're done, you're done.  If I had to sit down and tally I'd say 30 or 40 just with me."

General Manager of Parker Services Mark Novell says this is the busiest he's experienced in 22 years, and that if it's not an emergency or someone stuck in their car, it will have to wait.

"We're taking somewhere upwards of 100 calls an hour right now.  We're telling people that are not stuck and at home, that they are staying at home, we'll get to them Thursday or Friday."

To get a car or semi out of the snow take 15-30 minutes, so how do they stay warm while doing their job?

"You don't, you're cold.  You just try to bundle up the best that you can and deal with it."

Everyone that works for the company is working right now.

"All hands on deck, there is nothing we can change about it.  It has to be done."

Tow truck drivers are not the only ones braving the cold, for the sake of others.  The linemen that keep the power running to homes and businesses, fire fighters, police officers at the scene of accidents, and the postal service delivering medicine and other things people need.

"It is our job, but we do appreciate when people appreciate us.  The one thing we ask is give us some space so we can do our job safely, because we do have a family to go home to."

WFFT talked with the Fort Wayne Coroner's Office and thankfully so far there have been no deaths in relation to the cold and a big part of that can be attributed to these workers that give up being warm, for the comfort and safety of others.
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