Transitioning from Dependency on Foreign Oil Might have Solution for Alternative Fuel

Transitioning from Dependency on Foreign Oil Might have Solution for Alternative Fuel

The environmental concerns of burning hydrocarbon fuels and releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere continues to be a threat to our economy and our environment.
"I have burned vegetable oil in cars." -Nate Hodorek
The environmental concerns of burning hydrocarbon fuels and releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere continues to be a threat to our economy and our environment.

Transitioning from dependency on foreign oil has been a debating topic for decades, but the solution could be in your cleaning cabinet, or maybe even behind your favorite fast food restaurant.

Vehicles have been running on gasoline-fueled engines for more than a century, but as gasoline becomes higher in demand and is domestically limited, more consumers are searching for alternative fuel sources.

Daniel Miller is an advocate for using NH3, or ammonia, as an alternative fuel source.

"Particularly in our region, we have a couple pieces of infrastructure, both electric transmission and ammonia pipeline, to where a couple of these pieces of infrastructure are very close together."

"If we were able to site a commercial and industrial scale synthesis plant between these two pieces, we've made enough capacity such that the supply side would be available for our local area, and then if we wanted to have the consumer side to be able to use this supply, we could even form an NH3 fuel industry cluster that would bring business to produce both the supply side and consumer side technologies."

So not only can ammonia be used as fuel for transportation, but it can also store electricity for utilities on a local, regional, or even global scale.

Depending upon the price of electricity to produce the ammonia, fuel could be purchased at a price between $2.00 and $4.00 per gallon.

Nate Hodorek who has a different fuel source in mind says, "I have burned vegetable oil in cars."

Old diesel motors have the potential to drive for free.  As a diehard fan of old Mercedes Benz, Nate has found a way to operate his vehicle on a budget, while helping the environment.

He says, "There's things like hydrogen, things like electric cars, there's a lot of different ideas, but they're always 15 years out.  Vegetable oil is something we can do right now with existing cars on the road, with almost no modification to them."

It's not too difficult either.  Nate says, "Old diesel motors, you can literally dump it straight into the tank.  Obviously, you want to filter out the french fries and chicken breasts that's in it."

He also says it might take a bit of your time finding the oil and filtering it, but there could be an easier solution in the future.

"What we need to do is keep the vegetable oil from all the fast food restaurants in this county, which is a lot.  That would put a serious dent in the amount of diesel that we use."

More and more people are finding ways to eliminate the burning of fossil fuels.





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