66°F
Sponsored by

Snow Melts, Rivers On the Rise?

The cold is ending as the region begins to thaw out. All this past week, the story has been about getting over a foot of snow and record cold temperatures of nearly twenty degrees below zero. Friday was much warmer, and the snow is starting to melt. We take a look at if it means flooding.
"It's dirty water. It can have all sorts of toxins in it, gas and oil, and all sorts of things, so again, you don't want to touch it, with your hands, even with your skin.” Allen County Health Commissioner Doctor Deborah McMahan.
The cold is ending as the region begins to thaw out.

All this past week, the story has been about getting over a foot of snow and record cold temperatures of nearly twenty degrees below zero.

Friday was much warmer, and the snow is starting to melt.

We take a look at if it means flooding.

It certainly looks like it with all the snow run off, rivers unfreezing and much warmer temperatures.

The good news is it's going to take a while for all of this to melt.

But that doesn't mean that all this water doesn't pose a threat.

It's finally melting!

Even some of these side streets are becoming less frozen and more slushy.

And as the snow and ice melts, it could cause river levels to rise and could also cause big puddles of standing water on streets and in yards.

Health officials say that water could be dangerous.

"It's dirty water. It can have all sorts of toxins in it, gas and oil, and all sorts of things, so again, you don't want to touch it, with your hands, even with your skin,” says Allen County Health Commissioner Doctor Deborah McMahan.

You know all that road salt and chemicals the trucks have been spraying all week?

Yea, that's all in there too.

McMahan says it’s dangerous to drive through as well.

She says there could be debris, sharp objects, even live electrical wires, hidden under water.

And she says, even though it is warmer outside, they hear about children playing in the water every year, and it's never a good idea.

"Especially where there are pools of water out there, kids especially at this time of year, they forget how cold it can be. And so we worry about hypothermia,” McMahan says.

One of the good points about all of this is with all of the snow we've had in the past week.

It only came out to about an inch and a half of precipitation.

Which when you really look at it, over a week, that's really not a whole lot, when you expand it over a week and a wet part of the season.

The other good news- everything is still pretty much frozen, the rivers are still iced over, and all the snow is slowly melting, it's not hitting all at once.

Which means that it's good news, and it could help minimize the flooding threat.

McMahan says after storms like this one, more people tend to get sick, and often, sicker.

"We're seeing a lot of flu activity in our community and if you haven't been vaccinated, then now is the time to do it,” McMahan says.

And of course, the best thing you can do this weekend is to keep it tuned to WFFT.

Andrew will be in the weather center all weekend watching the rain and river levels, and will keep you updated.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
Got a news tip to share with us? Call us at (260) 408-WFFT or e-mail the newsroom at news@wfft.com.