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Senate Democrats Go Nuclear

Senate Democrats are going nuclear. They voted to end the ability of minority Republicans to use filibusters to block president Obama’s judicial and executive nomination.
“One of the reasons that Thursday’s actions happened is because of the abuse of the filibuster. It demonstrates party polarization is at such a level that the Senate isn't operating within its unwritten rules.” - Mike Wolf, IPFW Political Science Professor
 Senate Democrats are going nuclear.  They voted to end the ability of minority Republicans to use filibusters to block president Obama’s judicial and executive nomination. 

Democrats say the system is flawed and needs to be fixed

 “It's time to change the senate before this institution becomes obsolete,” said Harry Reid, Majority Leader. 

Republicans say this historic move will only increase tension in Washington.

“It puts a chill on the entire United States Senate,” said Senator John McCain, (R-Arizona).  

Going nuclear is the term coined for the senate democrat’s decision to lower the number of votes to break a filibuster.  It goes from 60 to 51. 

IPFW Political Science professor Mike Wolf, says the issue at hand only points to a bigger problem---party Polarization. 

“One of the reasons that Thursday’s actions happened is because of the abuse of the filibuster. It demonstrates party polarization is at such a level that the senate isn't operating within its unwritten rules,” said Wolf. 

The abuse that Wolf points to can be seen in the numbers.  In the history of the country there have been 168 filibusters of presidential nominees, and 82 of them have happened during the Obama administration.

“This is a real permanent change to the United States Senate and the way it works,” said Wolf. 

Indiana State Senator Dan Coats voiced his opposition to the move saying it's simply a ploy to try and distract the American people from the Obamacare debacle. 

 “This is purely a distraction and its an important distraction in that it breaks 225 years of history.   This is not what the founding fathers envisioned,” said Coats, (R-Indiana)

 

 

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