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Locally Made Monday - Bees and Carrots

We've introduced you to a lot of traditional businesses in our region here on Locally Made Monday. This week, we're doing something different. A new web site is serving as the region's hub for finding locally-sourced food.
We've introduced you to a lot of traditional businesses in our region here on Locally Made Monday.

This week, we're doing something different.

A new web site is serving as the region's hub for finding locally-sourced food.

Holly Chaille started her web site bees and carrots to help the growth of urban gardening and local foods grown in northeast Indiana.

But even though it's not revenue-driven, it's helped that local scene to grow.

A quick look around the web site- beesandcarrots.com- and it could feed your need for local food.

"It's a virtual hub. It's really a connecting site for people in the community who are local growers who want to eat local food, who are advocating for local community efforts to have urban farms and urban gardens,” Chaille says.

Chaille is a master gardener at the Purdue Extension office on the IPFW campus.

She says she's grown up with local foods, and has been using that love to help others.

"Been a gardener all my life really. And in the past three years have been working on a project called the fresh food initiative, which is a two-acre farm in town, where we work with refugees to help them grow food,” Chaille says.

She also works with other urban farms in the region, which led her to start the site.

She says you can get connected with several urban gardens, like this one at the Purdue Extension.

"But really what it boils down to is being able to farm within your community. We have an urban community, so those things would have to be in brown fields or abandoned lots or neighborhood green spaces,” Chaille says.
She says access to local foods is vital for our region.

“Primarily in my opinion, it's the access. There are a lot of people in our community who don't have transportation or maybe take the bus, they're isolated in the community's little pockets that have been deemed food deserts. They don't have a grocery store with produce in a mile of them,” Chaille says.

Check it out at-



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