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Local Man Denied Coverage Through Affordable Care Act for Pre-Existing Condition

We've all been told the Affordable Care Act is supposed to help people that have pre-existing medical conditions but now thanks to a loophole in the law, there are at least 22 people in Indiana with kidney failure that are not going to be able to get supplemental insurance coverage due to their pre-existing condition.
"I went on to the Obamacare website, healthcare.gov, I signed up, went through the whole nine yards, got everything taken care of. Supposedly, it told me I qualified for certain things but every time I tried to enroll it wouldn't let me. I've called in and tried to talk to them, and it doesn't go anywhere." - Matt Mawer
We've all been told the Affordable Care Act is supposed to help people that have pre-existing medical conditions but now thanks to a loophole in the law, there are at least 22 people in Indiana with kidney failure that are not going to be able to get supplemental insurance coverage due to their pre-existing condition.

WFFT's Brooke Welch has talked to a man with kidney failure that says the Affordable Care Act has given him a death sentence if something isn't done.

That's what one local Hoosier says could happen due to a letter he received from his insurance company this month.  The worst thing? He's not alone.

Exclusive details prove almost 2 dozen Hoosiers are in the same situation. 

Matthew Mawer has been fighting his entire life.  Born with damaged kidneys, he had his first kidney transplant at age 12, then one again in 2005.  When the 2005 transplant didn't go well, he had to start kidney dialysis in 2009.

Matt was expected to be able to continue dialysis until another kidney transplant match is found, but earlier this month he received a letter from Indiana Comprehensive Health Insurance terminating his policy.

"It's a letter basically telling me we're no longer going to be an entity anymore, the state insurance is going to go away.  We are dropping everyone."

At this point, Matt was concerned, but went to sign up for Obamacare, since he was told pre-existing conditions wouldn't be an issue.

"I went on to the Obamacare website, healthcare.gov, I signed up, went through the whole nine yards, got everything taken care of.  Supposedly, it told me I qualified for certain things but every time I tried to enroll it wouldn't let me.   I've called in and tried to talk to them, and it doesn't go anywhere."

Matt says he's been told that for him, there is one specific problem.

"I have ESRD4 which is in stage renal disease.  It means, I have no kidneys working whatsoever, and what happens at that point is they won't cover me...that's a loophole that they have they don't have to offer me coverage through Marketplace."

Matt does qualify for Medicare.  Medicare covers 80% of his treatment, but without supplemental insurance, Matt will not be responsible for the other 20%.  An amount of money that he doesn't have.

"5 to 7 treatments is around 70 - 75 thousands dollars.  I do 3 treatments a week."

 So with no financial means to pay thousands a month for treatment, and with no donor for a transplant, the January 31st insurance deadline weighs heavily on Matt.

"It's kind of one of those things where, if I don't get it taken care of, and I can't feasibly pay my bills, I'll probably just...that's the end."

Since the Affordable Care Act has been signed, President Obama has been stating wouldn't affect people with pre-existing conditions. 

WFFT has been told by an anonymous source within the state government that this case file of 22 people affected in Indiana has ended up on Kathleen Sebelius' desk, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services.  So the President's promise that anyone with a pre-existing condition would be covered, in the case of these 22 Hoosiers, wasn't true.


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