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Gov. Pence's Education Plan Ruffling Feathers

Education reform in Indiana has been a heated issue, as Governor Mike Pence has repeatedly butted heads with State Superintendent of Education Glenda Ritz. Tuesday, Governor Pence unveiled his education plan, and within hours, has gotten local education leaders talking.
"What that means is that every student in our public school system receives less and less." Mark GiaQuinta, Fort Wayne Community Schools Board of Trustees President
Education reform in Indiana has been a heated issue, as Governor Mike Pence has repeatedly butted heads with State Superintendent of Education Glenda Ritz.

Tuesday, Governor Pence unveiled his education plan, and within hours, has gotten local education leaders talking.

Governor Pence is calling his plan 'Roadmap 2014 Education,’ and it calls for expanding vouchers and the presence of charter schools.

But an FWCS board member, and the state teachers union both say it smells like a scam.

Governor Pence is calling on the republican-dominated state general assembly to revamp Indiana's education system in the upcoming session.

Tuesday, the governor unveiled his plan- Roadmap 2014 Education- which he says puts the emphasis on job and skills training.

The plan would expand the voucher system into pre-K for low-income families.

It also would give cash incentives to teachers who take jobs at underperforming schools or at charter schools in low-income areas.

It would also allow charter schools with more than one location to pool their budget into one, and would also require districts to allow charter schools to use vacant school campuses.

"This governor wants the taxpayers to subsidize private investors while the students in these schools suffer. It is a travesty,” FWCS Board of Trustees President Mark GiaQuinta says.

GiaQuinta says it's purely a political plan.

He says Pence's proposal to cut one billion dollars in business taxes eliminates the money needed to make his plan work.

"You have to understand how these charter schools operate. They pay their private investors a whole lot of money by jacking up the rental payments the taxpayers are forced to pay- almost to the tune of a million dollars in Fort Wayne, Indiana, before a charter school is closed,” GiaQuinta says.

The Indiana state teachers association agrees with GiaQuinta.

The union issued a statement today saying the money will be stretched too thin under Pence's plan.

"What that means is that every student in our public school system receives less and less,” GiaQuinta says.

This is just the next step in the war over the state education system between Governor Pence and Superintendent Ritz.

GiaQuinta says this is clearly a shot at her and her system.

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