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From the Beyond - The Hidden Side of Fort Wayne

Paranormal experts say northeast Indiana's history has been riddled with hauntings. WFFT investigated one historical place that some believe may have paranormal activity.
"Is there anybody here that would like to make communication with us?”
Paranormal experts say northeast Indiana's history has been riddled with hauntings.

WFFT investigated one historical place that some believe may have paranormal activity.

Over sixty years ago, the Clyde Theater opened in the Quimby Village on Bluffton Road in southwest Fort Wayne.

The nearly 1800 seat auditorium was used as a movie theater.

Since the early nineties, it has sat empty.

WFFT teamed up with a local ghost hunting group, spending several overnight hours inside the Clyde, to see if spirits rule the night.

After a failed renovation attempt in the mid-2000s, new owner Rick Kinney is fixing up the old theater and turning it into a concert hall.

We teamed up with members of a local ghost hunting team to find out- is the old Clyde Theater haunted?

The old Clyde Theater sat for years in this corner of a shopping complex on Bluffton Road- all but forgotten.

"I saw it and I knew I had to make it happen,” Kinney says.

Kinney owns even keel productions, and as of last year, now owns the Clyde Theater.

He's spent the past year renovating years of neglect.

He plans to turn it into a concert hall, add an organic restaurant, and space for school programs.

But among the rubble, a certain spookiness remains.

"I tend to be working constantly so I don't have a lot of time to think about spookiness necessarily, but you never know,” Kinney says.

"Being that it has a history that it does, the chances and probability of it possibly being haunted is pretty high,” says Jason Snyder.

I contacted Snyder- founder of the Indiana Team for Anomalous Research.

His team met us at the theater late one night to see what we could find.

"We take more of a scientific approach to what we do. We try to investigate with a solid process that we repeat each and every time under strict, controlled conditions,” Synder says.

Snyder says a typical investigation can last for eight to twelve hours.

We're doing two hours to see the process.

He's been to some of America's most haunted places.

"Some of us kind of take the standpoint that maybe there's a thread that's torn in the time-space continuum and if we live in a multi-dimensional reality, then there's a really, really good possibility that something on the other side is coming through to communicate with us,” Snyder says.

While the team does use a lot of equipment…

"We typically use a four-to-six camera DVR system. They're night vision cameras. We use handheld equipment such as EMF detectors, which will measure electromagnetic frequencies in the atmosphere,” Snyder says.

He says his favorite tools are audio recorders, and a notepad and paper- and their ears.

They look for EVP's, or electronic voice phenomenons.

Basically, noises.

We found a quiet place in the auditorium- and listen.

And then, we try to communicate.

"Is there anybody here that would like to make communication with us?”

"If there's somebody that's here with us, could you knock or move something in here?"

This time, nothing.

In a typical session, the team spends hours watching and listening to the recorded video and audio.

Snyder says environment is everything.

This night, we found nothing.

But in a full investigation, any number of ghosts could come out.

And after sixty years, it might have a lot to say.

Some team members tell me they've had personal experiences, where they've seen and heard, and even felt things that the cameras and recorders did not pick up.

Snyder has a book coming out next year about his experiences with the supernatural.

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