Employees at Fast Food Chains Walk Off the Job

Employees at Fast Food Chains Walk Off the Job

Employees at some major fast food chain outlets, in more than 50 cities, walking off the job and demanding a pay increase.
Employees at some major fast food chain outlets, in more than 50 cities, walking off the job and demanding a pay increase.

From coast to coast, the message is the same...higher wages from fast food chains nationwide.

"I have to do a three man job and I'm one person.  They're making billions and millions of dollars per day per year so for us to ask for $15 and a union, living in New York City is definitely not impossible."

Shenita Simon is just one of millions of fast food service workers who are struggling to get by, in the Big Apple, on just $8.00 an hour or less.

She joined hundreds of others, rallying for more money and a chance to organize without fear of retaliation.

"When people get together like this, if everybody in all the Wendy's come out right now, they're not gonna fire everybody out of Wendy's."

Unions and community groups have been staging similar protests in other cities over the past few months.

The walkouts were possibly the biggest yet taking place in more than 50 major cities.

Still, industry groups say the protestor's goals are unrealistic because individual franchises actually determine wage levels for workers.

For it's part, the Obama Administration has proposed raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $9.00 an hour and while some experts believe this will only hurt businesses, many protesters say it's just not enough.

"Most of these guys are, they may be young, and a lot of times they're starting families, also and they go to feed their families and $9.00 an hour just don't cut it."

It is unclear what impact, if any, the walk-offs had on the fast food chains.  Some store managers knew the protests were coming, and were able to plan ahead.
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