70°F
Sponsored by

Driving Safe in the Slush

Indiana State Police spokesperson officer Ron Galavez says there have been a few minor injuries, but no major ones, in the numerous spin offs and traffic accidents on the region's streets and highways. But as the roads begin to thaw, and more people get back behind the wheel, more accidents are likely. WFFT spoke with a winter driving expert who has some tips to stay safe.
"They are preventable. The weather does not cause crashes... The way that we drive in these conditions, the conditions are a contributing factor, but they are not the primary reason that we crash." -Officer Ron Galavez, Indiana State Police
Indiana State Police spokesperson officer Ron Galavez says there have been a few minor injuries, but no major ones, in the numerous spin offs and traffic accidents on the region's streets and highways.

But as the roads begin to thaw, and more people get back behind the wheel, more accidents are likely.

WFFT spoke with a winter driving expert who has some tips to stay safe.

"You know, we expected the volume of traffic to increase, which only meant the increased propensity of vehicle crashes,” Galavez says.

Since the snow emergency lifted earlier this week, law enforcement officers have been working all hours- dealing with the slide offs, accidents, and people driving too fast and not careful.

"They are preventable. The weather does not cause crashes... The way that we drive in these conditions, the conditions are a contributing factor, but they are not the primary reason that we crash,” Galavez says.

"Anytime you're on snow or ice, you want to go slower... If you slam on your brakes, you're going to more than likely slide off the road... You always want to be gentle when you're accelerating and gentle with your brakes as well,” says Josh Bradtmiller.

Bradtmiller is a driving instructor at the Safeway Driving School in Fort Wayne.

He says winter driving begins before even getting in the car.
You need to check your windows, clean your wheel wells, and check the tire pressure.

Also, have supplies in case you get stuck.

And just because it's warming up does not make the roads safer.

"And you know, on some roads, it might be fine, but if you get into a lot of slush, if you're going thirty miles per hour, and you go into a lot of slush, you might slide off the road. So you still want to go slow,” Bradtmiller says.

And above all on the roads, the most important thing you can have is patience.

It's going to take you a little longer to get anywhere, and even through the roads are looking like they're better, you still have to drive just a little bit slower.

"The speed limit might say fifty-five, but the basic speed law tells me that I need to travel as far as the conditions are going to allow. So you might only go twenty-five to thirty,” Bradtmiller says.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
Got a news tip to share with us? Call us at (260) 408-WFFT or e-mail the newsroom at news@wfft.com.