63°F
Sponsored by

State Board of Education Considers Alternative Teacher's License

The Indiana State Board of Education is considering a proposal that would allow more college graduates to become teachers. Superintendent Glenda Ritz is opposed to the proposal, but she's outnumbered. Eight board members voted Wednesday in favor of an alternative teaching license.
The Indiana State Board of Education is considering a proposal that would allow more college graduates to become teachers. Superintendent Glenda Ritz is opposed to the proposal, but she's outnumbered. Eight board members voted Wednesday in favor of an alternative teaching license.

This change to teacher licensing was introduced by former State Superintendent Tony Bennett. The original proposal would allow college graduates with a B-average in any subject to earn a teaching license in grades K-12.

State Superintendent Glenda Ritz and two other board members voted against the proposal to create a Career Specialist Certificate. Eight board members voted in favor of allowing professionals to apply to teach high school students. 

The Indianapolis Star is reporting that under the new proposal, applicants would need 6,000 hours of real-world experience. They would also need training after being hired as a teacher. 

Critics say the proposal would add untrained teaches to lead a classroom. Proponents say the broader pool of applicants would help districts find the best teaching candidates.

This proposal has not yet been implemented. The career Specialist Certificate was approved on Wednesday, but it's part of a larger group of teacher licensing changes that will be voted on later this year.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
Got a news tip to share with us? Call us at (260) 408-WFFT or e-mail the newsroom at news@wfft.com.