Shadarobah Horse Rescue Needs More Volunteers

Shadarobah Horse Rescue Needs More Volunteers

Now an update to a store we brought you in March. Back then, Shadarobah Horse Rescue was being evicted from their rural Allen County property. At the time, they were able to move 42 horses into foster homes. WFFT's Brooke Welch speaks with the president of the rescue, about how things are going today, and their plans for the future.
"The need is constant, because the phone still rings constantly."
Even though they were evicted in March, the Shadarobah Rescue mission is busier than ever.  Shadarobah Horse Rescue President Michelle Heitz said, "There is no level of gratitude that I could even be able to place a level on it, it's invaluable. And the need is constant, because the phone still rings constantly."

Heitz says of the 42 horses they were caring for back in March, several have been adopted over the last few months...and currently the rescue is caring for 27 horses at various locations.  "From being all spread out, it cost more in vet care, dental care, chiropractic...everything cost more. So we need to be able to get our income back up, to get everyone under the same roof."

Feeding and caring for the horses comes with a $4,000 a month price tag. And unfortunately, fundraising has been put on the backburner.
"To take care of horses that are in thirteen different locations. And to organize, and have enough people to put on a fundraiser....it's really really really hard."

But the volunteers are loyal. Joshua Wilson says the past six months have changed his life. "I've been in a lot of trouble in my past, and this just helps me focus on a new life..it helps...it's just amazing."

In prison last year, Wilson says the horses have cured his drug addiction.  "It just keeps my mind from wandering, just being able to work with them. It makes me feel so good, knowing that I've helped rescue an animal...that if they had stayed where they were could be dead now."

Heitz says you don't have to know anything about horses to join the cause.  "I mean every penny really and truly does count. So you don't have to have a place where you can keep a horse to help by any means, whatsoever. Any average everyday person there's something you can do."

Heitz has been through a lot, but explains why this rescue is so meaningful to her. "But to have 1,000 pound animal, put their head on your shoulder. And feel comfortable and safe with you, because you've taken them away from a situation that was horrible. Is just the most incredible feeling in the world.

If you would like more information on how you can get involved, the number is (260) 410 - 1999.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus