President Obama Delivers State of the Union Speech

President Obama Delivers State of the Union Speech

President Obama is trying to get himself out of a second term slump, before November's midterm elections, when control of Congress is up for grabs. He went into his State of the Union speech more unpopular than ever before.
President Obama is trying to get himself out of a second term slump, before November's midterm elections, when control of Congress is up for grabs. He went into his State of the Union speech more unpopular than ever before.

For over an hour, more than 7,000 words, President Obama telling his biggest audience of the year he's not waiting on Congress to start his "year of action".

"Wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that's what I'm going to do."

Obama wants to combat inequality using new executive orders on education, jobs, and energy that don't require congressional approval.  He's raising minimum wage for new federal contract workers and encouraged private sector businesses to pay their employees more too.

"Say yes.  Give America a raise."

Despite praising House Speaker John Boehner's life story, there wasn't much that Republicans seemed to like.

"I firmly believe when women succeed, America succeeds. Congress needs to restore the unemployment insurance you just let expire for 1.6 million people."

Obama made clear he's not interested in rehashing the health care fight.

"Now, I don't expect to convince my Republican friends on the merits of this law, but I know that the American people aren't interested in refighting old battles."

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers taking the opposite view in the official Republican response.

"Republicans believe healthcare choices should be yours, not the governments."

She was just one Republican offering her take.  3 others, also weighed in.

"The President's lofty rhetoric ignored the fact that his Administration continues to leave poor and middle class families further behind."

"He doesn't try to work with congress. He doesn't talk with congress."

"I didn't hear anything new from the president."

The issues may have divided the House Chamber, but the most powerful moment came late in the night and brought Democrats and Republicans to their feet.

Army Ranger Cory Remsburg, wounded by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan, left partially paralyzed, and blind in one eye, honored for his service and his resilience.

"Like the Army he loves, like the America he serves, Sergeant First Class Cory Remsburg never gives up, and he does not quit. Cory!"




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