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February 11th is "Safer Internet Day"

Internet is a necessity of life for most people these days and not just for adults. Children and teens have cell phones, IPads, and Kindle Fires just to name a few that all allow internet access. February 11th is "Safer Internet Day".
"Oh my gosh! What's going to happen to my child online?"
Internet is a necessity of life for most people these days and not just for adults.  Children and teens have cell phones, IPads, and Kindle Fires just to name a few that all allow internet access. February 11th is "Safer Internet Day".

While a lot of internet is helpful and can help your child learn, there is also a dark side online.  WFFT's Brooke Welch talked with experts on how you can keep your children safe online.

Pornography, viruses, and scams are all things your child or teen can fall victim to without proper guidance on their internet usage.

"Oh my gosh! What's going to happen to my child online?"

That's John Kaufeld, a Social Media guru for IPFW.  He says parents shouldn't fear the internet and should instead focus on building trust.

"They stumble into some content that they don't know what to do with.  If you've got a good connection with them, you as a parent have a good connection with them, then they are going to feel more comfortable coming to you with that."

Maurice Causey, a father of two teenagers and a 12 year old does not give his kids cell phones, and has one shared computer in a main room at home.

"They use a computer within the home.  Laptops and things can sort of get them in trouble a little bit, so I just keep that away from them."

Teenager McKayla Stein says besides her parents telling her she's on the internet too much, they don't monitor it at all.

"Not really, I wasn't supposed to have a Facebook but I had one anyways.  My mom knew about it so not really."

Whatever approach you take with your child, there are some things you can do.  Many computer programs allow you to put a block on adult content sites, and also encourage your children not to click on pop up ads.  If your child does stumble across something inappropriate, Kaufeld says to respond calmly.

"How did this happen and how can we stop it from happening again."

If you would like more tips on how you can protect your child or teenager online, you can go to Google.com/familysafety.
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