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Discussion: Fort Hood Shootings and PTSD

It's still unclear exactly what triggered Spc. Ivan Lopez to open fire at Fort Hood before committing suicide. The gunman was undergoing a variety of treatments for mental health issues including anxiety and depression. Lopez had not been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, but he was being evaluated to see if he had it. On social media, Lopez claimed to have a traumatic brain injury, even though the Army has no record of him being injured while in Iraq.
It's still unclear exactly what triggered Spc. Ivan Lopez to open fire at Fort Hood before committing suicide. The gunman was undergoing a variety of treatments for mental health issues including anxiety and depression.

Lopez had not been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, but he was being evaluated to see if he had it. 

"There may have been a verbal altercation with another soldier or soldiers and there is a strong possibility that that in fact immediately preceded the shooting," said Ft. Hood Commanding General Lt. Gen. Mark Milley.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that PTSD occurs in about 11-20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

According to a government funded study by the Institute of Medicine, almost one million service members and veterans were diagnosed with a psychological disorder between 2000 and 2011. The research shows almost half of these service members had multiple disorders. 

For more information about PTSD, visit the VA website at ptsd.va.gov.
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