Con-Artists Taking Advantage of Holiday Travelers

Con-Artists Taking Advantage of Holiday Travelers

Con-Artists are taking advantage of holiday travelers and trying to steal your personal information over Labor Day weekend.
Con-Artists are taking advantage of holiday travelers and trying to steal your personal information over Labor Day weekend.

If you're hitting the road, you might want to be careful which pump you're using at the gas station and who you're talking to over the phone in your hotel room.

WFFT's Tara Petitt has more on how to avoid becoming a victim this holiday weekend.

"It is a problem and it's a big problem."

Marjorie Stephens, CEO for the Better Business Bureau, says travelers need to be aware of con-artists that try to get your personal information while on the road or staying at a hotel.

"They might call and say they're the hotel manager or front desk.  Something was wrong with their credit card, they might say that their computers crashed and they need to see if the credit card was okay."

Mary Moore is the Sales and Advertising Manager for the Hilton Garden Inn in Fort Wayne.

"If a caller from outside calls in, we do call the room and ask them if they're waiting for a caller and give them the person's name so that there's no way that any outside callers could reach our inside."

Moore says the Hilton Garden Inn in Fort Wayne doesn't allow direct phone calls to the room, but if you're staying somewhere that security measures do allow these kinds of phone calls, be sure to talk to the front desk before giving out that personal information.

"It's always better to do things in person, just because then you know who you're talking to."

Also be aware of advertisements slipped under your hotel door that appear to be legit local pizza ads.  Scammers are replacing the restaurant's phone number with their own in order to get your credit card number.

Another way con-artists are getting a hold of your personal information is at the pump but in this particular scam, you could swipe your card, get gas, and not even know you just became a victim of a scam.

They're called credit card skimmers and it's a simple device that clips onto the real scanner and it copies your credit card number.

Stephens suggests using a pump closer to the door of the gas station or go inside to pay.

"Cash is probably your best means of not getting ripped off by someone."

Travel is meant to be fun and as long as you're smart about it, there's no reason it shouldn't be.
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