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Bull On Ice, Residents Steer Clear

Imagine looking out the window of your house and seeing a real rodeo bull on the loose, and standing in your yard. Residents of Cree Lake in Noble County saw it up close and personal Monday evening, as emergency crews scrambled to grab the bull by the horns.
Imagine looking out the window of your house and seeing a real rodeo bull on the loose, and standing in your yard.

Residents of Cree Lake in Noble County saw it up close and personal Monday evening, as emergency crews scrambled to grab the bull by the horns.

We’re told the bull really was a rodeo bull, and people who saw it say it was mean, angry an unapproachable.

It escaped from a farm north of Kendallville before leading fire crews and deputies on a wild bull chase.

"And we looked out the window, and a bull- a steer, we didn't know what it was, was standing on the ice about a hundred yards out,” says Cree Lake resident Mike Pasquali.

A wild rodeo bull on the loose Monday evening got even closer to the Pasqualis while they were out in the yard of their Cree Lake house.

"It was just standing in this area, kind of moving back and forth, just on our shore. On the ice,” Pasquali says.

They had no idea how dangerous the animal was- and that's no bull.

"And the bull started coming in toward us closer, and standing about ten feet in off the edge of the lake,” Pasquali says.

A neighbor, who had heard an aggressive bovine was on the run, yelled at them to go back inside.

"An ice fisherman came from across the channel and hollered at us, telling us to be careful because that bill will charge. Well, Mary just kind of talk to him a little bit,” Pasquali says.

As Kendallville fire fighters and Noble County sheriff deputies arrived, the bull split.

“It was looking at us, and then charged the group of us that was about fifty to seventy yards away from it... Three of us jumped in the back of a one-ton duley truck that was there, seeking refuge there,” Kendallville Fire Chief Mike Riehm says.

Riehm confirmed it really was a rodeo bull- and a mean one.

He says a farmer about two miles to the west owned it, and the bull escaped while it was being loaded to be transported to another part of the farm.

"He conveyed to me that he'd only had the bull for a week, and he couldn't keep an animal that was that mean and unmanageable,” Riehm says.

It quickly got dark, and crews searched with spotlights, before finding it another several miles away to the east.

No person was hurt or property damaged.

However, there was one casualty.

"But he did give the order to put him down if we had to. If we were able to get a tranquilizer shot into the animal, the dosage required- it would take multiples- and with the amount of adrenaline and as amped up as the animal was, it would probably have killed him anyways,” Riehm says.

Chief Riehm says the owner of that bull is the one who authorized emergency workers to put it down.

Mike Pasquali told me that had he known afterward how dangerous the animal was, he would have told his wife to come inside sooner.

They say if anything ever happens like this again...they'll steer clear.

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