75°F
Sponsored by

50 Years Since Martin Luther King Jr Delivered "I Have a Dream" Speech

It has been 50 years since a defining moment in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1963 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
It has been 50 years since a defining moment in the Civil Rights Movement.  In 1963 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Dr. King's dream of equality is being remembered.  Members of the King family, as well as President Obama and former president's Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter were also there.

Those who were here 50 years ago and those wanting to retrace the steps of history outlined their dreams 5 decades after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr made his dream known to the world.

Bells rang out at the "Let Freedom Ring" commemoration at the exact hour Dr. King delivered his now famous vision.  The unforgettable voice paved the way for this moment.

President Obama, the nation's first black president standing exactly where Dr. King stood, reflecting on the progress and the work that remains.

"No one can match King's brilliance but the same flame that lit the heart of all who are willing to take the first step for justice.  I know that flame remains."

The program also brought Myrlie Evers-Williams to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial who was scheduled to appear in 63' but was unable to attend.

"They come with laws that tell people to stand their ground."

Standing between 3 presidents on one side and the King family on the other, Congressman John Lewis, the last surviving speaker of the original 1963 march challenged the nation as Dr King did to make good on it's promise.

"We may have come here on different ships but we are in the same boat now."

President Obama and others also pointed out the original march was about jobs and economic justice, noting black unemployment remains almost twice the national average.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
Got a news tip to share with us? Call us at (260) 408-WFFT or e-mail the newsroom at news@wfft.com.