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Going Green: "Soarin Hawks" Raptor Rehab

We are back in Huntertown visiting a raptor rehab called Soarin Hawks who have been rescuing, rehabilitating, and releasing birds of prey since 1993.
"Last year we took in about 125 birds and we have about a 50% release rate." - Pam Whitacre
We are back in Huntertown visiting a raptor rehab called Soarin Hawks who have been rescuing, rehabilitating, and releasing birds of prey since 1993.

Their rehabilitation birds can be found all over the United States and some of them as far as Costa Rica.

"These birds are the fastest flying birds in the world.  When they're diving for prey, they've been clocked at 200 miles per hour."

Pam Whitacre is a volunteer for Soarin Hawks Raptor Rehab in Huntertown, Indiana.

"I'm one of several volunteers that help rescue, rehab, and release birds of prey."

These volunteers pick up and rescue injured owls, hawks, eagles, falcons, and turkey vultures.

"Last year we took in about 125 birds and we have about a 50% release rate."

The rehab has a veterinarian on the property that assesses injured birds and helps to rehabilitate them.

"The birds that cannot be released into the wild because they have injuries that are too severe, we keep them as educational birds and we take them around to the public to show them and teach the public about raptors."

After rehabilitation, many of the Soarin Hawks' birds are sent to different centers across the country.

"We have a bald eagle in Salt Lake City, Utah, we have a red tailed hawk at Busch Gardens, we have 3 birds at the St. Louis Zoo, we have 3 birds at the zoo in Fort Wayne, and we have also taken some of the birds and placed them with other rehabbers in the state."

Whitacre say their message to the public is that raptors are good and they're needed just as much as any other creature, for a sustainable environment.

"They help keep down the rodent population and we think that they're a very important part of the conservation effort in the environment."

Soarin Hawks Raptor Rehab asks the public that if you find an injured bird to call DNR or their facility director and they will pick it up for rehabilitation.
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